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Ochax 05-02-2010 11:50 PM

Does anyone agree with me on this??!
 
Hey everyone :)

i have a theory that everyone around me disagree with, and i don't understand why!, so i decided to see what everyone here thinks about it.. ;)

isn't it true that most interesting part of a weight loss process is the diet process itself??!

I'm almost there to my goal weight and i feel a little sadness about it, don't you? i know it's a lifestyle and all but once you finish wight loss program you'll start a maintaing program which is totally different.

Thanx

NessaSonic 05-03-2010 12:00 AM

i've gained a lot of appreciation for food. More so than when I was bingeing every day. I don't think I'll be sad at the end of my journey- there's usually room for improvement- not just about weight loss, but amping up nutrients and gaining greater physical ability. I am hoping at the end of my journey, I'll be hooked on exercising and that I'LL be one of those beautiful, confident joggers that give people inspiration I see every day on my walk.

dizzy_44 05-03-2010 12:44 AM

I've been on this journey for a month now, and in that time, I've started to see food in a whole new way. I no longer see a bbq chicken breast with bbq sauce...I now see 17 g protein with 3 g saturated fat. Carrots are no longer carrots, they are now 5 g complex carbs. I'm obsessed now and find that everything I eat falls into 1 of 5 catagories: protein, bad fat, mono fat, complex carbs or simple carbs(avoid white food). I see food more as fuel & nutrients now, and I want to keep it that way.

The "diet" process is very important because thats where we are truly learning about the food we eat and the activity we need. That is also where we develop the "if I can do this, I can do anything" attitude.

With everything you have learned on your journey...I'm sure you'll do great on the next journey, whatever it is.

almeeker 05-03-2010 02:58 AM

I guess I don't see the "diet" process as ending, because once I get down to my goal weight, I'm still planning to eat. I'm working really hard, not so much just to lose weight but to adopt a thinner lifestyle, so no I guess I don't see an end in sight, nor do I think reaching my goal weight will make me sad. I keep picturing myself so happy that others reach over and slap me for it.

Built 05-03-2010 12:49 PM


Originally Posted by Ochax (Post 9921)
Hey everyone :)

I'm almost there to my goal weight and i feel a little sadness about it, don't you? i know it's a lifestyle and all but once you finish wight loss program you'll start a maintaing program which is totally different.

Thanx


What I've discovered is that the maintenance program isn't that much different than the "losing" program. We need more calories to maintain but not A LOT more...so we're talking maybe 2 slices of bread instead of 1, and maybe an extra piece of fruit. Point being if we do the same things we did before starting this new lifestyle, we will get the same old results. :)

fletch8502 05-03-2010 04:10 PM

I totally agree. The sense of accomplishment is a lot less when you're maintaining than when you're losing. You also stop getting all those lovely compliments and motivating remarks when you've been at your goal weight for a while. Maintaining is definitely still a goal to work towards and a lifestyle to have, but it's just a little bit more boring than losing!

Not that I have any solutions for this, just wanted to let you know that I agree. =)

Also, I find that I have false hopes as to what will happen when I reach my goal weight. I think that I'll be beautiful, happy, successful, in a positive relationship, etc. when I'm at my goal. However, that's never the case. True, my clothes fit better, I'm in better shape, and I have more energy, but weight's really just a number. It takes a lot more than that to change a life. I'm trying really hard this time to remind myself of that this time. Hopefully this will break the cycle of losing the same 20-30 lbs over and over again, trying to get to that goal weight, trying to be happy and being disappointed when it doesn't happen!

Anyone else experienced THAT aspect of the goal weight?

farahb7 05-03-2010 08:06 PM

i wish i was there so i could tell you how i felt. but, still have a long way to get there.:(
At this point, i don't like how my jeans fit and also i absoulotely hate fittingroom mirrors, since they show exactly what's wrong with my body. weight loss is going to make me happier with my self image, and i know i'll be healthier at that stage. but i won't expect for miracles to happen, since even now i try to do my best in what i do, i tell my kids and hubby how much i love them every single day, i have good days as well as bad days etc.

MichelleKoren 05-04-2010 06:30 PM

This is a very interesting thought. I haven't really considered it. I have been trying to lose weight for so much of my life and have reached my goal weight and kept it for so short a time. The last time I did, I got pregnant with my third child within a few months. :)

I would like to think that I will be proud of my self and my body in a respectful way, not a flaunt what you've got sort of way. My efforts at weight loss this time around are the same as after my second child and that is with a focus on exercise. I am hoping that I have found something that I can continue forever and won't get bored with.

I am going to have to think on this a little more. The process of dieting has definitely been a learning process.

almeeker 05-04-2010 06:35 PM


Originally Posted by fletch8502 (Post 9958)
Also, I find that I have false hopes as to what will happen when I reach my goal weight. I think that I'll be beautiful, happy, successful, in a positive relationship, etc. when I'm at my goal. However, that's never the case. True, my clothes fit better, I'm in better shape, and I have more energy, but weight's really just a number. It takes a lot more than that to change a life. I'm trying really hard this time to remind myself of that this time. Hopefully this will break the cycle of losing the same 20-30 lbs over and over again, trying to get to that goal weight, trying to be happy and being disappointed when it doesn't happen!

Anyone else experienced THAT aspect of the goal weight?

Nope, at my goal weight I'm still planning on being so happy that people just want to reach over and slap me.

cjohnson728 05-04-2010 06:55 PM

fletch...I can relate. I got to my goal weight almost 2 months ago. That day, I posted my surprise at how my body did not automatically assume all the right proportions that I had expected it to. Since then I've been working on toning up and improving cardiovascular fitness. I assume that continued goals means it's a lifestyle change and not just a "Whew, I'm done now!"

Adding the calories back in has been a little anxiety-provoking for me. It's not an exact science and I don't want to go overboard, so I'm going slowly. I still log food and activity and see that as the way to being successful at maintenance, because information is power and lets me know when I have to make changes.

On the other hand, there really is a sense of accomplishment in being in better shape than I have ever been in my life :D.

ehloring 05-08-2010 02:21 PM

I reached my goal the end of last year - took me approx the year to lose 75-80 lbs. And now, I have been working hard to maintain the loss - keeping myself challenged with exercise, still watching my foods. I have a range of about 4 lbs that I like to stay between. I do understand what you are saying. There was some comfort level, trying to lose the weight - knowing I was in that mode. It seems strange to not have to lose anymore weight - when I've always had to lose weight my whole life! Granted - this is a lifestyle change and we will always have to watch our foods and exercise - but it is a new feeling to have to get accustomed to. I try to keep myself challenged with new goals - like running races and training to increase my stamina and distance.
I also think being at your goal weight is rather scary - you worry about gaining the weight back, you worry about not being able to control yourself (not all the time, but it's always in the back of your head) I guess there is an adjustment period you have to go thru in your brain, as well as getting your body adjusted.
So - in answer to your question - more interesting when you are losing weight? - I'm not sure if it's more interesting, but there was a certain comfort level.

RunbikeSki 05-08-2010 11:27 PM

I totally agree!
 
Fletch, I reached my goal a couple of weeks ago and I did, indeed, feel a sense of loss. I think it has something to do with having to change focus after being so focused on the diet for so long. I have had a similar responses to other accomplishments. Like organizing a big meeting. After months of planning, solving logistic problems, setting agendas etc, as the meeting finally adjourns there is a swell of relief, gratitude, and sadness. Because I have lost that 1 thing that I was so focused on for so long (or so it seemed).

I get what everyone was saying about how the journey isn't really over, and how the maintenance requires the same diligence, but you and I know that somehow it just isn't the same.

The good news is that inevitably something else comes along to fill that void!
So yippee for us and it is on to the next thing! ;)

wannabefitgrl 05-11-2010 12:45 AM

I'm not yet at the 'maintenance' stage, but for those who are, I was wondering what you do differently now than when you were trying to lose.

My dilemma is this: I work out twice a day and watch every calorie the goes into my mouth. Once I get to where I want to be, does that have to be my life for the rest of my life? Or do I get to eat a few more calories (keeping my intake equal to my output) and keep up the twice a day workouts? Or can I drop the morning workouts but keep my calorie count controlled?

I know I've worked hard to lose the weight and don't want to gain it back, but I also don't want to feel trapped into such a crazy schedule. Sometimes I'll get a call from a friend or my boyfriend during the week to have dinner and a little voice in my head goes crazy thinking I'll have to skip my evening workout or I'll eat too much or too late, it goes on and on. I don't want to feel like that forever. I want to be able to happily accept a dinner invitation at some point in my life!

I'm not looking for some scapegoat way out, just wondering how much work it will be to maintain the body I worked so hard to get. Any responses from those of you currently maintaining would be great. Thanks so much!

blackrhino2 05-11-2010 03:18 AM

hey wannabefitgirl, I've been on WW maintenance since spring of '06. I do have a bit more give in my diet, but not much. I still need to keep track of everything. I still need to exercise--but I only exercise hardcore about 3 times per week, although in general I'm a pretty active person.

once you're at your goal, you can add in say another 100 cals and see if you gain, if you still are losing then add in another 100. it's a bit of trial and error.

i really have just gotten used to knowing that this is how it will be...always being careful, but not 100% of the time. I still binge a little every week and it just tends to even out because I keep it in check (but I am still trying to drop a few lbs). i still go out to eat and but i try to order smart and ask them to not bring me the side of rice or whatever it comes with. drink lots of water, only have a 2 or so drinks of alc a week....just always working to keep my eating under control.

so with all that said, i'd say that it still is a lot of work for me, although it is worth it because i feel so much more confident and healthy and I don't ever want to let go of that.

RunbikeSki 05-15-2010 10:43 PM

Changes in perspective
 
Hi wannabefitgirl.
I think that once you reach your goal, mostly your perspective changes. Food or not food isn't the center of your life any more. If you can continue working out twice a day and enjoy it, why stop? But if it is starting to get really old, find a new activity, of change-up your workouts so that you will be happy to continue exercising. That part of your new life should continue as long as you possibly can The key is to continue doing just what you are doing now, but not be so obsessive about it.

The great thing about Fitday is that it gives you lots of chances to see what works for you rather than prescribing a set of eating requirements. If you have used Fitday for a pretty long time, you have learned how much food you can eat, and what kinds of food you feel good about eating, and what kinds need to be reserved for special occasions.

Julia's suggestion is just what I did. I slowly added the calories back so that I didn't go wild and eat everything in sight, and it gave me the chance to ease back into a "normal" eating habit. But in truth, my new normal is quite different from the old normal of 18 months ago.

So, yup, you will still have to be mindful of your eating and exercising habits, but you shouldn't have to count every single calorie and you shouldn't have to spend all your free time at the gym

Pam

wannabefitgrl 05-26-2010 12:49 AM

Another question for those of you who are maintaining...what kind of exercise are you doing and how often?

Right now, I alternate weights one day (with maybe a short, easy jog after) and a day of more intense cardio. I like the cardio to shed fat and the weights to tone up my muscles. Should I stick with this concept once I move from losing to maintaining? I might be able to shorten the workouts a little or lessen the intensity since I'll only be maintaining, but I assume it is still important to stay toned up, right?

I was thinking maybe some pilates might even help be kind of cardio/kind of strength training that I might really enjoy once I'm in my maintenance stage. (Weird for me to be thinking that the maintenance stage might not be too far off...)

cjohnson728 05-26-2010 03:14 AM

Hi fitgirl (sounds like you're ready to drop the wannabe!),

I'm maintaining. I do cardio 4-5 times a week (right now it's either tennis or jogging). I do two full-body workouts with weights twice a week.

I've been kind of afraid to back it off...it's not too much different from what I was doing when losing. I know I will change it up eventually, just to keep it different and I doubt I'll be playing much tennis when it's 95 degrees...I think at that point I'll hit interval training pretty heavily on the treadmill and exercise bike.

I have some DVDs and pilates that I can throw in there also. I think the key is to do more than just one thing over and over and over again.

Sounds like you have a pretty good plan. If it stops working, you'll know soon enough, and you can change it.

fourank 05-26-2010 06:04 AM


Originally Posted by cjohnson728 (Post 11804)
Hi fitgirl (sounds like you're ready to drop the wannabe!),

I'm maintaining. I do cardio 4-5 times a week (right now it's either tennis or jogging). I do two full-body workouts with weights twice a week.

I've been kind of afraid to back it off...it's not too much different from what I was doing when losing. I know I will change it up eventually, just to keep it different and I doubt I'll be playing much tennis when it's 95 degrees...I think at that point I'll hit interval training pretty heavily on the treadmill and exercise bike.

I have some DVDs and pilates that I can throw in there also. I think the key is to do more than just one thing over and over and over again.

Sounds like you have a pretty good plan. If it stops working, you'll know soon enough, and you can change it.



I wish it stayed under 95 degrees where I am at. I am deployed and on a diet. I have a goal weight of 175 and currently at 222. so I still have a long way to go. I run and do aerobics everyday.

As for the diet I would think that it is still a game of numbers the only difference is how big your numbers are when you are maintaining.

daniellejokela 05-26-2010 06:43 PM

I am hoping that once I get through the next few months and get to my target weight, by then, some of this should be second nature. I think I will have a better idea of what a good portion of food actually is, rather than just eating until my plate is clear or having to measure everything to control the calories. Also, after working so hard to establish a routine of excercise and workouts, I think it will be harder to stop. By the time I reach my goal, I will have been at this for so many months, that not exercising will probably feel strange or I will notice the lack of energy and be motivated to get back on it.

@ fitgirl: I think that once you get past the initial major weight loss, you can probably back down off of the twice daily workouts. I would be willing to bet that once you get the weight off, you would be able to get in one workout per day, be mindful of what you're eating, and the weight will stay off. I would say, alternate the weights with the cardio, do cardio on Monday, weights on Tuesday, etc. But also try to mix it up so that your body doesn't get complacent. Pick up a soccer or basketball leauge, something that requires a lot of running and physicallity. Not only will you get in that extra workout, you will have way more fun than doing a gym routine, and you will make new friends!

@ fletch: There are so many psychological barriers that stop us from being truely happy. I can understand the thought that if I were thinner, people would like me more, or I would be able to get that job, or be more confident, or just be able to be happy. In the long run, and I know you already know this, being thin doesn't make you happy, and you aren't unhappy because you aren't at your target weight. You have to find a way and reasons to be happy and to love yourself every single day, despite what size you wear, or what the scale says. Being thinner is really about being healthier. Being healthier will lead to increased energy, and lots of other good things that contribute to your happiness, but being thinner cannot be your single source of happiness.

ChunkyDunk78 07-22-2010 11:02 PM


Originally Posted by Ochax (Post 9921)

isn't it true that most interesting part of a weight loss process is the diet process itself??!

I'm almost there to my goal weight and i feel a little sadness about it, don't you?
Thanx


Actually, that is pretty much par for ANY kind of goal-- think of it as graduating-- bittersweet, right? You've reached your goal, but the journey was exhilarating, empowering, and something you did JUST FOR YOU :)

chezbez 07-23-2010 04:42 AM


Originally Posted by almeeker (Post 9932)
I guess I don't see the "diet" process as ending, because once I get down to my goal weight, I'm still planning to eat. I'm working really hard, not so much just to lose weight but to adopt a thinner lifestyle, so no I guess I don't see an end in sight, nor do I think reaching my goal weight will make me sad. I keep picturing myself so happy that others reach over and slap me for it.

Hi Almeeker

I couldn't help but notice that you've lost 88lbs in only 19 weeks - that's PHENOMENAL! I just joined fitday.com today (basic member) and have a target weight loss of 63lbs in 12 weeks. Any tips?

Charlotte

almeeker 07-23-2010 10:23 PM


Originally Posted by chezbez (Post 16543)
Hi Almeeker

I couldn't help but notice that you've lost 88lbs in only 19 weeks - that's PHENOMENAL! I just joined fitday.com today (basic member) and have a target weight loss of 63lbs in 12 weeks. Any tips?

Charlotte

Actually I've only been on fitday for 19 weeks, but I was dieting before that. I started dieting in Sept '09, and lost 16 pounds then I quit between Thanksgiving and Christmas, and gained 10 pounds back :eek:! On December 26, 2009, I got serious about losing weight and have lost another 83.5 pounds in the last 7 months, for a grand total of 89.5 pounds.

63 pounds is 12 weeks would be a little rough for me. Although in the beginning I did have some 5-8 pound loss weeks. I'm not doing a specific diet, nor am I taking pills, and I didn't have any kind of surgery. So outside of saying "diet and exercise" I don't have any "miracle" weight loss tips. What has been working for me is to keep my calories between 1,350-1,600 (although lately my metabolism has changed and that has been harder and harder), make sure my pie chart is 40-40-20 (carbs, proteins, fats), or nearly so. Drink 96 ounces of water each day and put in a 60 minute workout at least 5-6 days/week. My workout is typically 60-75 minutes of hard cardio on the elliptical or the running track, but twice a week I lift weights and do an ab routine that would make Superman cry (okay, maybe not exactly true, but in the comic book of my mind, those crunches are worse than kryptonite baby). That's it. Now that I've been at it for 7 months +, it's almost my habit anymore. The days I skip the workout, I hurt and don't feel lively and awake, so exercising has become almost an addiction. I need it like my coffee in the morning, although I have yet to actually feel a "craving" for it.

katsntx 11-18-2010 03:03 AM

I agree
 
I think part of what you might miss is not so much the diet itself but just the process of changing. When dieting, you get dozens of compliments from friends, coworkers and family members and those will likely slow down after they get used to you being your goal size.

a.vannice 11-18-2010 05:59 AM

i noticed at the beginning of this week that my "diet" is now a normal way for me to eat, not a struggle. i'm spending less time thinking about what i'm eating it so it almost feels like i'm cheating myself by not being meticulous. however, that allowed me to focus more on challenging myself with exercise. i think it comes down to where you focus your ambition.

Elongbrake 11-21-2010 03:23 AM

I can totally relate.I reached my goal back in July. I changed my goal to losing another 5 lbs by the very end of this year...just so I can see the progress on Fitday. Once you reach your goal you don't see the progress anymore. It kinda worries me when I do reach my goal. Taking all of your advice by attaining success in other aspects of my weight loss is totally a consideration and excites me too!

vabeachgirlNYC 11-22-2010 01:16 AM

I reached my jean size goal this month by choosing to live a healthy and active lifestyle. My "diet" is just eating healthy and enjoying treats in moderation.

Mentally, getting here has proved to me that I really am the one in charge of my body, even when I hit a brick wall (injury, surgery, getting sick, etc). Those setbacks would have been easy to use as excuses to give up trying, trust me I did sometimes use them, but deep down I really knew that there was no excuse, no matter how hard it was and how long it took me.

I now realize that I am not done by reaching what I had always thought would be my "end" goal. Before hitting my goal I was asked if I would be interested in training for a fitness competition. I remember thinking me? hahaha. yeah right, but it has made me think of what I could really accomplish now that I hit that size goal... So I guess I am really just starting again.... just to see what I can do now.

As far as compliments, I still get them but now I get more specific ones. My two favorites so far, was being told I have skater thighs (lol, I'm not quite there yet!) and being asked if I lift "real weights" because my shoulders/arms were pretty darn defined for a girl! :D

TBH, I do sometimes miss the "extra padding" but only when sitting on a hard surface or when my body hits something too hard! :eek:


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