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Glitter Sunscreen Is on the Market, but Does It Protect You From the Sun?

Are you ready to sparkle this summer?

There is a sunscreen on the market that will have you ditching the illuminator and highlighter, but does glitter sunscreen actually protect your skin?

Shimmering lotions are enjoying their moment in the limelight, first with Rihanna’s Fenty Beauty’s body glitter collection, and now with Miami-founded Sunshine & Glitter’s Seastar Sparkle. The latter markets itself as being a “super fun glitter sunscreen” which is apparently filled with antioxidants (vitamin E and green tea extract), PABA and Paraben free, and “provides broad spectrum UVA/UVB protection and 80 minutes of water resistance” It also smells delicious and is available in three different scents; Party Cake, Very Berry and Mango Tango.

The appeal for this sort of sunscreen is obvious and will give every woman (and man) a flawless finish. Plus, sunshine and glitter seem to go together so well, but is this really a good alternative to regular sunscreens? According to Elite Daily, this product may have glitter in it, but it is also legit in that it will protect you from the sun and the broad spectrum UVA/UVB sunscreen has an SPF 50.

The Sun also questioned whether the sunscreen’s effectiveness would be affected by the addition of glitter and asked New-York based dermatologist Sejal Shah this question. She told the publication, “The effect of glitter should theoretically not cause a change in the effectiveness of the sunscreen as long as it is applied in a sufficient amount to cover the exposed areas of skin. Glitter is technically not approved by the appropriate bodies, but it is generally considered safe for the skin.”

Although Sunshine & Glitter’s Seastar Sparkle claims to be made with non-irritant glitter, if itching, burning, or any other irritation happens after it’s applied to the skin then it’s best to ditch it. If not, then it seems that the general consensus is that this product is safe and fabulous!


[Image via Shutterstock]

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