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Can Too Much Exercise Damage Your Body?

You feel that rush of endorphins pumping through your body after a good workout, you feel as though you've accomplished something, and you can see the change in your body after exercising regularly. But too much of a good thing, even with exercise, should be cautioned because it is possible to exercise too much.

As for how much exercise is too much? According to Huffington Post Australia, how much you workout should be dependent on a number of factors including age, overall health status, body composition, and experience. Each individual has their own threshold, and according to the publication, this should be taken on an individual basis.

There are recommendations though, and the Department of Health and Human Services (via Mayo Clinic) notes that these guidelines include “at least 150 minutes of moderate aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity a week, or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity.” As well as muscle strength training a minimum of two times per week.

Although this differs depending on how fit an individual is, for example, an athlete, would do well in excess of the recommended guidelines.

Too much exercise can affect the body in many ways, including becoming more at risk of illness, weakened bones caused by the hormone cortisol’s interference with bone-building, and permanent structural damage to the heart muscles, The Telegraph reports.

And sweat sessions too often could also impact mental health. There is a diagnosis known as Overtraining Syndrome, which studies have revealed those who suffer from it have biochemical markers that share similarities with those who are clinically depressed, The Telegraph notes.

Huffington Post Australia states that too much exercise can “lead to injuries, exhaustion, and hormonal imbalance." And although it is hard to pinpoint signs that someone is exercising too much, symptoms could include trouble sleeping, decreased appetite, restless legs, and dehydration.

[Image via Shutterstock]

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