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Old 01-08-2010, 02:53 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default How to calculate baseline metabolism?

I have found various calculations that give me a great range of results, from 1750cal to 3320cal.
What is a reasonable method to calculate this?
Thanks!
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Old 01-27-2010, 06:35 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by ele89869 View Post
I have found various calculations that give me a great range of results, from 1750cal to 3320cal.
What is a reasonable method to calculate this?
Thanks!

Sorry to not be of any help but I wonder the same thing. Ive tried different methods and they show quite a differance which is confusing. I dont like to guess what my baseline metabolism is since it makes it quite difficult to know exactly how much I need to cut my calories and how much work-out I must put in.
Ive just taken the average sum of all the different numbers Ive gotten. Im quite small so I use 1250 at the moment. I dont think it could be any lower than that which puts me on the safe side :-)
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Old 01-27-2010, 02:02 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Default Many variables

There are a number of variables that impact basal metabolic rate, besides height, weight and age:
  • the amount of lean tissue in your body
  • whether you're well-hydrated
  • whether you're well-rested
  • current fitness level
  • what medications you may be on
  • whether your body has experienced starvation in the past
  • whether caloric intake right now is sufficient or deficient
  • whether you have any health conditions
  • gender (hormone levels and differences)
  • whether you have any long-term vitamin deficiencies
  • past illness (and corresponding treatments)

There's a number of ways to estimate baseline metabolism, with some more detailed than others. At the end of the day, though... they are only estimates. Taking the average of different methods is probably as reliable as any one might be for you.

A physiologist who takes your medical history into account and delves into your current lifestyle can tell you what method might fit you best. Without that detailed knowledge, it's a best guess.
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Old 01-27-2010, 02:22 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Default

I kind of went the same route as Jenna...went to about 7 different online calculators and sort of took the average. Have to say though, about half were in the 1400-1500 range and half were in the 1700-1800 range; probably a difference in formulas. I KNOW the BMR on FitDay is way too high for me, so I'm just playing around and seeing what works.
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Old 01-28-2010, 02:19 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by ArchyJill View Post
I kind of went the same route as Jenna...went to about 7 different online calculators and sort of took the average. Have to say though, about half were in the 1400-1500 range and half were in the 1700-1800 range; probably a difference in formulas. I KNOW the BMR on FitDay is way too high for me, so I'm just playing around and seeing what works.
Yes, I think the BMR here seems to be a little bit too good to be true :-) On the other hand...when I exercise for an hour with something, say running or biking they estimate quite a low number compared to other sites where I can calculate how much Ive lost due to my weight, gender and so on. Itīs a differance in more than 200 kcal sometimes. Anyone else notised the same?
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Old 01-28-2010, 02:20 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by KimmyRocks View Post
There are a number of variables that impact basal metabolic rate, besides height, weight and age:
  • the amount of lean tissue in your body
  • whether you're well-hydrated
  • whether you're well-rested
  • current fitness level
  • what medications you may be on
  • whether your body has experienced starvation in the past
  • whether caloric intake right now is sufficient or deficient
  • whether you have any health conditions
  • gender (hormone levels and differences)
  • whether you have any long-term vitamin deficiencies
  • past illness (and corresponding treatments)

There's a number of ways to estimate baseline metabolism, with some more detailed than others. At the end of the day, though... they are only estimates. Taking the average of different methods is probably as reliable as any one might be for you.

A physiologist who takes your medical history into account and delves into your current lifestyle can tell you what method might fit you best. Without that detailed knowledge, it's a best guess.
So if Ive starved myself in the past, say a couple of years ago. How would that effect my metabolism today?
Same with vitamin deficiencies?
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Old 01-28-2010, 03:15 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Default I'll try to answer (sorry it's a long one)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jenna1977 View Post
So if Ive starved myself in the past, say a couple of years ago. How would that effect my metabolism today?
Same with vitamin deficiencies?
I think that would depend on how drastic the starvation and how long your body had to survive under those conditions. When your metabolism adapts to try to survive under those conditions, it becomes more efficient when faced with drastic decreases in calories. Your body learns to feed on itself and breaks down lean tissue (and not just muscle - your organ tissues as well) which impacts how many calories your body requires going forward. (An extreme example would be an Anorexia survivor - it can takes years for a body to re-adapt and respond during recovery.)

If you've been kind to your body and kept it well-fueled ever since... your metabolism might not kick into survival mode to conserve energy when you decrease calories. But if you've done a lot of crash dieting, it's likely that your metabolism is still affected. With each bout of what your body perceives as a threat, it's likely to kick into survival mode that much quicker. It becomes an adaptive response.

It takes time to build up the lost lean tissue and rev the metabolism back up. Since everyone is different, how long it takes to recover isn't a simple question to answer. Some bodies adapt faster and hang on to those survival-mode 'memories' for longer than others.

Hope that helps, Jenna.
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Old 01-28-2010, 07:28 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by KimmyRocks View Post
I think that would depend on how drastic the starvation and how long your body had to survive under those conditions. When your metabolism adapts to try to survive under those conditions, it becomes more efficient when faced with drastic decreases in calories. Your body learns to feed on itself and breaks down lean tissue (and not just muscle - your organ tissues as well) which impacts how many calories your body requires going forward. (An extreme example would be an Anorexia survivor - it can takes years for a body to re-adapt and respond during recovery.)

If you've been kind to your body and kept it well-fueled ever since... your metabolism might not kick into survival mode to conserve energy when you decrease calories. But if you've done a lot of crash dieting, it's likely that your metabolism is still affected. With each bout of what your body perceives as a threat, it's likely to kick into survival mode that much quicker. It becomes an adaptive response.

It takes time to build up the lost lean tissue and rev the metabolism back up. Since everyone is different, how long it takes to recover isn't a simple question to answer. Some bodies adapt faster and hang on to those survival-mode 'memories' for longer than others.

Hope that helps, Jenna.
Thanks for answering Always nice to learn new things about the body and itīs speacial ideas and functions!
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